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C. Duggan, J. Gannon and W. A. Walker, “Protective Nutrients and Functional Foods for the Gastrointestinal Tract,” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 75, No. 5, 2002, pp. 789-808.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Evaluation of Sensory Properties of Probiotic Yogurt Containing Food Products with Prebiotic Fibresin Mwanza, Tanzania

    AUTHORS: Stephanie L. Irvine, Sharareh Hekmat

    KEYWORDS: Probiotics, Prebiotics, Yogurt, Functional Food

    JOURNAL NAME: Food and Nutrition Sciences, Vol.2 No.5, July 6, 2011

    ABSTRACT: Yogurt becomes a functional food upon incorporating probiotics-live microorganisms which when adequately administered confer health benefits. Prebiotics are fermentable fibres that nourish beneficial gastrointestinal microflora enhance the functionality of probiotics. This research aimed to improve the acceptability and functionality of probiotic yogurt produced in Mwanza, Tanzania by incorporating probiotic food ingredients. The probiotic culture Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and standard yogurt cultures Lactobacillus delbrueckii bulgaricus and Steptococcus thermophilus were used to manufacture yogurt, then locally available prebiotic food ingredients containing fructooligosaccha- ride/inulin were incorporated. A nine-point facial hedonic scale was used to evaluate five yogurt samples. A mean score between one and three indicated that the sample product was well accepted. Probiotic yogurt containing onions, garlic and sweet potato received a score of 1.6 ± 0.84 (p 0.90), and plantains, 5.3 ± 2.56 (p > 0.90) were not well accepted. Sweet, mildly flavored prebiotic ingredients were most successfully incorpo- rated into probiotic yogurt in Mwanza.