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Pappalardo, M.C. and Melhem, M.S. (2003) Cryptococcosis: A Review of the Brazilian Experience for the Disease. Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo, 45, 299-305.
https://doi.org/10.1590/S0036-46652003000600001

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Ocular Findings of Cryptococcal Meningitis in HIV-AIDS Patients

    AUTHORS: Miriam Díaz, Bety Yánez

    KEYWORDS: Cryptococcal Meningitis, HIV, AIDS, Ocular Findings, Blindness

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Access Library Journal, Vol.5 No.8, August 27, 2018

    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To describe the ophthalmological characteristics, clinical course and visual prognosis of HIV-AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Methods: Retrospective study conducted in HIV-AIDS diagnosed outpatients treated at Dos de Mayo Hospital, from 2004 to 2014. Descriptive statistics were obtained for age, gender, associated diseases, CD4 T cell counts, antiretroviral therapy (ART), cryptococcal meningitis symptoms, relapses and visual complaints data. Diagnosis was based in CSF analysis, Chinese dye and culture. CSF opening pressure was recorded. Descriptive statistics were performed. Results: 18 cases were studied. 16 men and 2 women. The range of age was 24 - 51 and median 33 years. Three patients had been treated with ART. Tuberculosis was the most frequent associated disease IN 5 cases (27.8%). Cryptoccocal meningitis relapses were present in 5 (27.8%). CD4 count below 50 was the most prevalent in 11 (61%). Thirteen had ocular symptoms, low visual acuity was present in the half of cases and diplopia in 2 (11.1%). 13 (72.2%) coursed with headache. In eleven cases, the CSF opening pressures had been reported, and the range was 18 - 350 mm H2O, mean 67-6. CSF culture was obtained in 11 patients, it was positive in 7 (38.9%). Indian ink was positive in 16 (88.9%). Conclusion: There was no blindness related with cryptococcal meningitis despite the higher values of CSF opening pressure reported.