Symmetry in Equations of Motion between the Atomic and Astronomical Models

DOI: 10.4236/jhepgc.2017.32028   PDF   HTML   XML   831 Downloads   1,145 Views   Citations

Abstract

In this paper, we are going to find out a simple way yet extraordinary to the equation of motion of electric charge under the influence of a central force. We’ll find that it is the same as the formula of the common equation of motion in the theory of general relativity which controls the motion of planets around the sun; thus, every electron orbiting around the nucleus has a perihelion which revolves same as Mercury perihelion yet faster 2000 times according to Hydrogen atom, assuming that hydrogen has a perihelion. That is to say, when Mercury perihelion takes three million years to complete a full cycle around the sun, we find that Hydrogen perihelion (here we mean the classical model of atom, not quantitative model of it) revolves around the nucleus at 1.05 × 1012 cycle per second. In addition, the radiation passing near the nucleus deviates same as the deflection of light passing near the sun yet with a greater value according to how close the radiation is from the nucleus, as shown in the discussion. We discussed briefly (but differently) the definition of black holes to affirm symmetry principle between the atomic and astronomical models. Symmetry in equations of motion of a body in the atomic and astronomical models indicates that the Advance of Mercury’s Perihelion, deflection of light passing near the sun, and the definition of black holes are the ABCs of classical physics; however, they are not considered as reliable evidences on the soundness of the principle on which the theory of general relativity is built on, in the presence of a contradiction between the definition of gravity in the general relativity and in the electromagnetic theory.

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Abou Layla, A. (2017) Symmetry in Equations of Motion between the Atomic and Astronomical Models. Journal of High Energy Physics, Gravitation and Cosmology, 3, 328-338. doi: 10.4236/jhepgc.2017.32028.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

References

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[2] Abou Layla, A.K. (2016) The Khromatic Theoary, Al Manra.
[3] Wikipedia, Momentum. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Momentum
[4] Schiller, C. (2012) Motion Mountain, the Adventure of Physics. Relativity, 2, 165.
[5] Schiller, C. (2012) Motion Mountain, the Adventure of Physics. Relativity, 2, 169.

  
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