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On the Contribution of Nigerian Female Dramatists to Indigenous Theatre Development

DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1101325    2,019 Downloads   3,136 Views  

ABSTRACT

Nigeria’s performance theatre consists of variety of creative works reflecting the cultural diversity of its people. Many of the written texts and stage performances are slices from everyday lives of the people, captured by these playwrights and shown to the audience through live theatre. The paper examines the contribution of Nigerian female dramatists in the development of theatre in Nigeria. The paper advances that this group of theatre practitioners contributed to the overall development of the art of theatre by telling the stories of the women folk through plays. The works of these playwrights threw light on the experiences as well as concerns of Nigerian women. Particular attention is given to the conscious call by female dramatists for increased inclusiveness and consideration in the social, cultural and political relations with the male folk. The study adopted an analytical approach of the themes of selected play texts by Nigerian female dramatists to identify the ways that were explored.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Ukwen, K. (2015) On the Contribution of Nigerian Female Dramatists to Indigenous Theatre Development. Open Access Library Journal, 2, 1-8. doi: 10.4236/oalib.1101325.

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