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Assessment of the Level of Knowledge of the Nature of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Demonstrated by the Nigerian Veterinary Laboratory Staff Involved in HPAI Diagnosis in Nigeria

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DOI: 10.4236/ojvm.2015.54012    2,605 Downloads   3,007 Views  

ABSTRACT

The study was designed to evaluate the level of knowledge of Nigerian Veterinary Laboratory Staff on the nature of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) disease using structured questionnaires. The study comprised the Staff of National Veterinary Research Institute (NVRI) and five reference Veterinary Teaching Hospitals (VTH) designated for HPAI diagnosis. A total of 69 questionnaires were distributed to the laboratory staff. Questions on the general nature of the disease such as the cause, signs, mode of transmission, methods of identification, lesions, control and prevention, etc. were asked. The results showed that 77.38% of the staff answered all the questions correctly indicating their considerable knowledge of the HPAI disease. Considerable percentage of the staff listed correctly the equipment used for serology (36.23%) and RT-PCR (31.88%). Interestingly only 13.04% of the staff listed correctly the equipment used in rapid tests despite the fact that they are simpler and recommended for all P2 laboratories. In conclusion, the veterinary laboratory staff assessed demonstrated a significant level of knowledge on HPAI diagnosis; however, most of their laboratories lack the structure, organization, funds and basic facilities required for effective HPAI diagnosis.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Alkali, B. , Tanyigna, K. and Yabo, Y. (2015) Assessment of the Level of Knowledge of the Nature of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Demonstrated by the Nigerian Veterinary Laboratory Staff Involved in HPAI Diagnosis in Nigeria. Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine, 5, 89-92. doi: 10.4236/ojvm.2015.54012.

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