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Communicative Significance of Traditional Symbols in Oron Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State: Trend and Prospects in Conflicts Resolution

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DOI: 10.4236/ajibm.2014.49054    6,298 Downloads   8,788 Views  

ABSTRACT

This study was carried out to ascertain the “Oro” traditional communication system and modes employed in conflicts resolution. Interviewing key persons, considered in the opinion of these researchers to be custodians of the culture of “Oro” people and thus acknowledgeable in the traditional trends, as well as prominent indigenes of the area, was considered an appropriate instrument for gathering data. In addition, a lot of secondary data were consulted to establish a common link between the past, present and what constitutes “Traditional Communication System” among a people. It was discovered that the communicative significance of the eight (8) selected modes— Ogbin, Olughu, Oduk Eni, Ndo, Nkang, Obio Utong, Mmong and Ukpong—were still credible and efficacious in transmitting important and strategic messages to the “Oro” people. Ogbin, for instance, still serves as an injunction and is effective in restraining parties in a conflict. Olughu is still employed to establish truth in maters in serious contention, though sparingly due to its dire consequences. The younger generations are not well versed in traditional communication symbols but still adhere when so informed. Therefore, this study espouses trado-modern system of communication to meet the demand of information dissemination retrieval as a critical resource in 21st century.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Udomisor, I. , Ekpe, J. and Inyang, U. (2014) Communicative Significance of Traditional Symbols in Oron Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State: Trend and Prospects in Conflicts Resolution. American Journal of Industrial and Business Management, 4, 482-498. doi: 10.4236/ajibm.2014.49054.

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