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Impact of Flexible Working Hours on Work-Life Balance

DOI: 10.4236/ajibm.2014.41004    13,972 Downloads   25,501 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Nowadays, flexible working hours are becoming important to the workplaces. A lot of organizations offer flexible working hours to employees due to the benefits that flexibility gives to both employee and employer. Greater employee productivity and higher organization profitability are the most common benefits. Also, flexible working hours promote and facilitate work-life balance. Reduced stress and increased employee wellbeing are outcomes of the work-life balance. In this paper, the relationship between flexible working hours and work-life balance is investigated.

Cite this paper

S. Shagvaliyeva and R. Yazdanifard, "Impact of Flexible Working Hours on Work-Life Balance," American Journal of Industrial and Business Management, Vol. 4 No. 1, 2014, pp. 20-23. doi: 10.4236/ajibm.2014.41004.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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