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Clark, C. (2014). The Great Flood of 1726 at Bruton, UK. Weather, 69, 249-253.
https://doi.org/10.1002/wea.2272

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: The Value of Using Unofficial Measurements of Rainfall: The Dublin Storm and Flood of June 1963

    AUTHORS: Colin Clark

    KEYWORDS: Raingauge Network, Unofficial Data, Maximum Rainfall Estimation, Dam Safety

    JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Geoscience and Environment Protection, Vol.7 No.2, February 22, 2019

    ABSTRACT: Rainfall measurements are vital for the design of hydraulic structures, climate change studies, irrigation and land drainage works. The most important source of design rainfall data comes from convective storms. Accurate assessment of the storm rainfall requires a fairly dense network of raingauges. In 1963, such a storm took place over Dublin in Ireland. However, the existing raingauge network was insufficient to identify both the depth and pattern of rainfall. An appeal was made by Met Eireann for additional unofficial rainfall data. The result was remarkable in that the estimated maximum rainfall depth was found to be more than double the official value and that the resulting depth area analysis suggested a rainfall volume over a large area much bigger than the original isohyet map indicated. This result has huge implications for the estimation of maximum rainfall and dam safety assessment, especially in countries where the raingauge network has a low density. This paper first provides a description of the synoptic conditions that led to the storm, second an analysis of the rainfall data and how the unofficial measurements produced a very different depth area relationship; third, the social consequences of the resulting flood are described. Fourth, the storm is then placed in the context of other storms in the British Isles Finally the implications for rainfall measurement, gauge density and an example of how revised estimates of probable maximum precipitation (PMP) have been used to improve the safety and design standard of a flood detention dam are discussed.