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Schenk, P.M., Thomas-Hall, S.S.R., Stephens, E., Marx, U.C., Mussgnug, J.H., Posten, C., Kruse, O. and Hankamer, B. (2008) Second Generation Biofuels: High-Efficiency Microalgae for Biodiesel Production. BioEnergy Research, 1, 20-43.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12155-008-9008-8

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Photobioreactor of Microalgas for CO2 Biofixation

    AUTHORS: Yordanka Reyes Cruz, Gisel Chenard Díaz, Andreina Z. Figuera Leonett, René Gonzalez Carliz, Vinicius Rossa, Luciano Basto Oliveira, Maurílio Novais da Paixão, Donato Alexandre Gomes Aranda

    KEYWORDS: Biomass, CO2 Capture, Cultivation, Microalgae, Photobioreactor

    JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Power and Energy Engineering, Vol.7 No.1, January 25, 2019

    ABSTRACT: Microalgae are unicellular organisms capable of photosynthesis, turning sunlight and carbon dioxide (CO2) into rich biomass. Precisely because of this definition, in recent years various sectors have been targeting their ability to reduce CO2 emissions and the capacity of simultaneously synthesize biomass which can be later used to produce bio-fuels. Besides being considered fast-growth microorganisms, microalgae have a diverse biochemical composition with similar characteristics to traditional biomass. In this context, the present work aimed to evaluate the biofixation of CO2 by the microalgae Monoraphidium sp., cultivated in a closed-window type photobioreactor, as well as characterization of microalgal biomass produced in relation to the total lipid content (TL), lipids converted into biodiesel (LCB), carbohydrates and proteins. The results achieved showed that the best result was obtained after 24 h of cultivation, where for each gram of biomass produced approximately 1.2 g of CO2 were consumed. In the growth phase the average biomass productivity in the Janela photobioreactor was 58 mg·L-1·day-1 concluding that microalgae culture systems could be coupled to the chimneys of large industries emitters CO2 using this gas, resulting from combustion processes, in the process of photosynthesis. The biomass Monoraphidium sp. produced had a content of lipids converted into biodiesel of approximately 8.36% ± 2.69%, carbohydrates 32% ± 3.37% and proteins 34.26% ± 0.41%.