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Toson, E.A. (2011) Impact of Marijuana Smoking on Liver and Sex Hormones: Correlation with Oxidative Stress. Nature and Science, 9, 76-87.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Chronic Marijuana Smoking Does Not Negatively Impact Select Blood Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Young, Physically Active Men and Women

    AUTHORS: Richard J. Bloomer, Matthew Butawan, Nicholas J. G. Smith

    KEYWORDS: Marijuana, Cannabis, Oxidative Stress, Lipid Peroxidation, Protein Oxidative

    JOURNAL NAME: Health, Vol.10 No.7, July 17, 2018

    ABSTRACT: Background: The smoking of Cannabis sativa, the marijuana plant, is increasing in popularity among young adults, even those who may be engaged in regular exercise (i.e., athletes). Research has shown the plant to have antioxidant and analgesic properties, but the effects on oxidative stress are conflicting. The purpose of this study was to measure blood oxidative stress and cardio-metabolic parameters in physically active men and women who regularly smoke marijuana. Methods: A total of 43 marijuana smokers (23 ± 4 years) and 22 non-smokers (24 ± 7 years), who did not smoke tobacco products, participated in this study. Both smokers and non-smokers engaged in regularly exercise, totaling several hours per week (6.4 ± 4.0 and 6.8 ± 4.4, respectively). Smokers reported using marijuana frequently during the week (4.5 ± 2.3 sessions) for a minimum of three consecutive months prior to participating in the study. Blood samples were collected from participants following a 12-hour fast (all food, drink [except water] and smoking) and analyzed for malondialdehyde, advanced oxidation protein products, glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Heart rate and blood pressure was also measured and recorded. Results: No differences of statistical significance were noted for any variable (p > 0.05), with very similar values noted between smokers and non-smokers. Conclusions: In a sample of young, physically active men and women, regular marijuana smoking is not associated with untoward effects on select biomarkers of oxidative stress and cardio-metabolic health. These findings do not suggest that marijuana smoking can be done without harm, as limitations of this study need to be considered.