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Johnson, B. (2016a). Chapter: Consciousness: Using Clinical Evidence To Link Consciousness With Its Twin Perils Of Psychosis and Violence. In L. Alvarado (Ed.), Consciousness: Social Perspectives, Psychological Approaches & Current Research. Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=60019

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: The Scientific Evidence That “Intent” Is Vital for Healthcare

    AUTHORS: Bob Johnson

    KEYWORDS: Thermonuclear War, Quantum Uncertainty, Intent, Healthcare, Healthier Psychiatry

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Philosophy, Vol.7 No.4, September 18, 2017

    ABSTRACT: THINKING cannot occur without electrons, a point philosophically, scientifically and irrefutably confirmed for all, by the Electroencephalogram (EEG). However for 100 years, electrons and their ilk have scrupulously obeyed the Uncertainty Principle. Probability rules. The way human beings reason is by concluding that if event B is seen to follow cause A, it will do so again tomorrow—electrons don’t even support this today. Hume’s critique of causality which Kant failed to refute, gains traction from Quantum Mechanics. Despite needing to insert the word “probably” into every human reasoning, healthcare demonstrates an element of unexpected stability. The label “intent” is expanded to cover this anomaly, endeavouring to highlight how living cells cope with the impact of this unknowability, this Uncertainty. Mental health follows suit, though here the uncertainty comes additionally from “blockage” of the frontal lobes consequent upon trauma/terror. The collapse of today’s psychiatry is pathognomonic, and medically solipsistic. The role of “intent”, and its close relative, consent, are offered as remedies, not only for mental disease, relabelled here “social defeat”, but also for the global disease of violence, culminating in the biggest health threat of them all, thermonuclear war.