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Miller, D.L., Force, S.D., Pickens, A., Fernandez, F.G., Luu, T. and Mansour, K.A. (2013) Chest Wall Reconstruction Using Biomaterials. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 95, 1050-1056.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2012.11.024

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Experience with Porcine Acellular Dermal Collagen Mesh (Permacol™ Surgical Implant) in Chest Wall Reconstruction after Resection for Rib Osteomyelitis

    AUTHORS: Claudia Hannele Mazzetti, Patrick Carlier, Alexis Therasse, Jean Lemaitre

    KEYWORDS: Osteomyelitis, Permacol, Rib, Thoracotomy, Thoracic Wall, Chest Wall

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Thoracic Surgery, Vol.5 No.2, June 9, 2015

    ABSTRACT: Chest wall reconstruction after rib resection is essential to ensuring chest wall stability, avoiding flail chest and pulmonary hernia, and improving pulmonary function. Traditionally, a synthetic mesh and a musculocutaneous flap have been used to bridge the chest wall defect. However, a risk of secondary prosthesis infection exists. Acellular dermal collagen mesh implants (Permacol™) are indicated for the reconstruction and reformation of human soft connective tissue. A case of a complex chest wall reconstruction after rib resection for osteomyelitis due to staphylococcus aureus infection in a malnourished, immunosuppressed, and methadone-addicted patient is presented. The patient underwent a left posterolateral thoracotomy and chest wall resection, involving three ribs and the soft tissues overlying an infected cutaneous fistula. The chest wall was reconstructed using a 28 × 18 cm piece of porcine sterile acellular dermal collagen mesh. A successful chest wall repair was achieved with no incisional herniation and with complete mesh incorporation, allowing physiologic respiratory movements. A typical wound seroma developed and resorbed over the following months. There was no infection. In conclusion, this case report suggests that Permacol™ surgical implant can be used successfully as an alternative to synthetic mesh in reconstruction of an infected chest wall.