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Tinning, R., McCuaig, L. and Hunter, L. (2006) Teaching Health and Physical Education in Australian Schools. Pearson, Frenchs Forest.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: How Often Do You Move? Improving Student Learning in the Elementary Classroom through Purposeful Movement

    AUTHORS: Emily McGregor, Karen Swabey, Darren Pullen

    KEYWORDS: Elementary Education, Purposeful Movement

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.3 No.6, May 21, 2015

    ABSTRACT: It is estimated that 85 percent of students in school are natural kinaesthetic learners. It has been suggested that these particular learners are not being catered to through traditional teaching practices. There is a growing body of evidence to support the connection between physical movement and increased student academic achievement. This research differs from existing literature as it focuses on teachers’ inclusion of physical movement in everyday classroom learning. The aim of this research was to investigate how and why elementary school teachers incorporate movement into everyday classroom learning. Qualitatively, significant differences were found between how teachers believed they integrated movement into their everyday classroom learning, and how movement can be integrated to benefit student’s engagement and academic achievement. These findings suggest that the integration of movement into everyday classroom learning significantly increases student engagement. Professional development for teachers as well as communities of practice, need to be accessible by teachers in order for them to learn how to integrate movement into their everyday classroom learning and therefore increase their students’ academic achievement as well as engagement in learning.