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A Case Study of the Communication Pattern and Participation in Life of a 51-Year Aphasic Adult in Natural Setting

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DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1100444    1,062 Downloads   1,388 Views  

ABSTRACT

Aphasia is an impairment of language ability which results in a language disorder. Aphasic (Aged) patients are believed to have bad communication pattern and also low participation in life. This study examined communication use and participation in life for aphasic adults in natural setting. The study employed the case study research design which involves the use of a 51-year-old aphasic patient. The study area was Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. The purposive and convenience sampling method was used, which include the purposive selection of the aphasic adult patient. Two major instruments used for this study are interview and discussion. Data obtained were analysed qualitatively. The result showed that, the aphasic patient has major deviant problems in the substitution of sound /‘p’/ for /‘b’/ and also making incomplete statements, which produce a confusion between the aphasic patient and the listeners. In conclusion, the aged aphasic patient under investigation does differ from the existing ones, specifically, expressive aphasia as there was slight difference in his communication patterns and life participation seems also slightly different from that of the aged non-aphasic. In addition, his aphasic condition is not as high as others born with it.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Omiunu, O. (2014) A Case Study of the Communication Pattern and Participation in Life of a 51-Year Aphasic Adult in Natural Setting. Open Access Library Journal, 1, 1-8. doi: 10.4236/oalib.1100444.

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