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Field Comparison of the Impact of Different Treatment Durations in the Treatment of Acute Otitis Externa

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DOI: 10.4236/ojvm.2013.36047    3,445 Downloads   5,624 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute otitis externa is a common multi-factorial disorder in the dog. Several topical preparations are available on the veterinary market, which are licensed for an either specified duration of treatment or for a discretionary period that is determined by the clinician. Objectives: To compare the efficacy of two topical products, both licensed for the treatment of otitis externa in the dog, but with different treatment durations. Animal Population: One hundred and sixty dogs were enrolled in this multicentre field study from which 157 dogs were analysed in the Per Protocol sample (73 Aurizon?treated animals and 84 Easotic?treated animals). Method: Dogs were randomly assigned to Aurizon?or Easotic?treatment groups. Aurizon?(Vétoquinol SA: marbofloxacin, clotrimazole, dexamethasone) was administered daily in the affected ear(s) for 7 or 14 days, and was compared with a daily administration of Easotic?(Virbac SAS: gentamicin, miconazole, hydrocortisone aceponate) for 5 days. General and localised clinical signs were scored on days 0 (D0), 3 (D3), 7 (D7), 14 (D14) and 21 (D21). Results: Clinical cure rates at the end of treatment were 56.3% and 48.8% (p=0.35) in the Aurizon?and Easotic?groups respectively and 81.2% versus 74.7% one week after completing the course of treatment (p = 0.34). Twenty-one days after initially presenting for the study, cure rates were 84.3% in the Aurizon?group and 73.8% in the Easotic?(p=0.12). A relationship between severity of clinical signs and treatment duration was observed. Conclusion and Clinical Significance: At the end of the trial period, cure rates showed a tendency to be higher in the Aurizon?treated animals. The flexible dosage and the veterinary monitoring permitted treatment duration to be adjusted based upon the severity of otitis externa thus increasing the likelihood of clinical cure.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

E. Grandemange, F. Pillet, O. Roy and F. Woehrlé, "Field Comparison of the Impact of Different Treatment Durations in the Treatment of Acute Otitis Externa," Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine, Vol. 3 No. 6, 2013, pp. 289-296. doi: 10.4236/ojvm.2013.36047.

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