Psychology

Volume 10, Issue 7 (June 2019)

ISSN Print: 2152-7180   ISSN Online: 2152-7199

Google-based Impact Factor: 1.27  Citations  

Positive Maternal Attitudes during Infancy and a Positive Lifestyle May Be Associated with Beneficial Epigenetic Alterations and Prevent or Improve the Symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease

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DOI: 10.4236/psych.2019.107062    204 Downloads   354 Views  
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ABSTRACT

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and the cause of premature senility, resulting in progressive mental deterioration and neurobehavioral deficits. AD is caused by the accumulation of β-amyloid protein, which leads to the accumulation of phosphorylated protein causing neuronal death in various areas of the brain, such as the hippocampus, which is associated with memory. This process is associated with oxidative stress caused by excessive reactive oxygen species. Serotonin may contribute to a greater ability to manage stressful events via growth factors. Melatonin may enhance the regeneration of tissues with the help of various growth factors. This process is associated with epigenetic alterations. Warm-hearted maternal attitudes during infancy and a positive lifestyle, which includes a well-balanced diet, moderate aerobic exercise, purpose in life (“ikigai”), and other warm-hearted human relations, may increase the secretion of serotonin and melatonin along with the well-balanced secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones. Increased secretion of serotonin and melatonin may contribute to a better ability to manage stressful events, and may enhance the prevention and treatment of the symptoms of AD by decreasing levels of β-amyloid and facilitating the regeneration of tissue in the hippocampus.

Cite this paper

Ishida, R. (2019) Positive Maternal Attitudes during Infancy and a Positive Lifestyle May Be Associated with Beneficial Epigenetic Alterations and Prevent or Improve the Symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease. Psychology, 10, 953-957. doi: 10.4236/psych.2019.107062.

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