Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Volume 5, Issue 10 (September 2015)

ISSN Print: 2160-8792   ISSN Online: 2160-8806

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Women’s Preferential Contraceptive Methods in Publics’ Family Planning Centers in Lomé (Togo, West Africa): A Prospective Study of 734 Cases

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DOI: 10.4236/ojog.2015.510080    2,526 Downloads   2,986 Views  

ABSTRACT

Justification and Objectives: The reasons for the choice of contraceptive methods in Lomé were insufficiently documented. The current study aimed to identify preferential contraceptive methods in women in Lomé and the reasons for the choices. Materials and Methods: Prospective study conducted on 734 clients recruited in five family planning centers in the municipality of Lomé over a period of 3 months (30th September to 30th December 2005). Data were collected by direct interview and processed by Excel and Epi info 7 software. Results: Contraceptive methods preferred in descending order were: Medroxyprogesterone acetate injection (51.6%), Norethisterone enantate injection (17.3%), inert Intra Uterine Device (12.0%), Progestogen implants (11.0%), combined oral pills (8.03%) and spermicide jelly (0.1%). The main reasons for choices were the method’s reversibility (32.56%) and its long acting property; especially in illiterate women (p < 10-10). Friends and medical staff counted for the choice in 9.26%. In 76.87% of cases, the husbands were reported to agree with the chosen methods. Conclusion: The choice of contraceptive methods in Lomé was mainly guided by the notion of reversibility and its long acting property. The focus should be put more on the quality of counselling towards women with low education level.

Cite this paper

Adama-Hondégla, A. , Aboubakari, A. , Fiagnon, K. , Bassowa, A. , Badabadi, E. and Akpadza, K. (2015) Women’s Preferential Contraceptive Methods in Publics’ Family Planning Centers in Lomé (Togo, West Africa): A Prospective Study of 734 Cases. Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 5, 564-571. doi: 10.4236/ojog.2015.510080.

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