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Comparative Analysis of Carbon Monoxide Modeling from Vehicular Sources in Puebla City, México

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DOI: 10.4236/jep.2015.61009    3,222 Downloads   3,650 Views  

ABSTRACT

The results of dispersion modeling of carbon monoxide are reported in this paper. The results of applying the technique of Rapid Assessment of Sources of Environmental Pollution (RASEP) database and the Air Monitoring State System in the City of Puebla, México, were employed. Concentrations of carbon monoxide emitted by cars inferred by RASAP technique with those reported by the environmental monitoring station “Nymphs”, were compared. The date of 21 June 2005-2010 was selected during the peak hour traffic flow. The dispersion of carbon monoxide was modeled by software DISPER and SCRI software, in order to infer the exposure levels of carbon monoxide in the study area. The estimated and monitored concentrations were evaluated with the Mexican regulations for population’s health protection. Regarding the dispersion model, SCRI was discarded for the target validation because it only allows modeling on specific areas. Moreover, the modeling software allowed DISPER simulations with linear sources of car exhaust, so this advantage is considered appropriate to continue using this program. Both estimates obtained by RASEP, as modeled by DISPER and recorded by the monitoring system exceed the maximum permissible limits of NOM-021-SSA1-1993 getting an impermissible for the area of influence of the assessment monitoring station. The DISPER software has potential use for such evaluations, but more work is required on the system for their inferences can be validated by reproducible physical and chemical measurements.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Sedeño-Cisneros, S. , Osorio-Lama, M. , Valera-Pérez, M. and Cabrera-Cruz, R. (2015) Comparative Analysis of Carbon Monoxide Modeling from Vehicular Sources in Puebla City, México. Journal of Environmental Protection, 6, 77-83. doi: 10.4236/jep.2015.61009.

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