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A Randomized Comparison of a Parker Endotracheal Tube and a Standard Tube Oriented 90° Counterclockwise

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DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2012.25050    4,307 Downloads   6,204 Views  

ABSTRACT

Purpose: During oral fiberoptic intubation, advancement of an endotracheal tube (ETT) into the trachea is occasionally impeded by laryngeal structures. The curved flex tip Parker ETT has been shown to improve the likelihood of successful advancement as opposed to a standard ETT that is advanced in neutral orientation. However, a Parker tube has not been compared to a standard ETT oriented 90° counterclockwise from the neutral position. We hypothesize that fiber-optically-guided advancement of an ETT into the trachea will be more successful when using a Parker tube than a 90° counterclockwise-oriented standard ETT. Methods: This unblinded, randomized controlled trial compares the rate of successful advancement of a fiberoptically-guided endotracheal tube into the trachea. Two groups of randomly assigned patients with non-difficult airways are compared: a Parker flex-tip tube (Parker Group; n = 57) versus a standard ETT oriented 90° counterclockwise (Standard Group; n = 58). Our primary outcome is the first pass success rate of advanceing the ETT into the trachea. Results: First pass success occurred in 48 of 57 (84%) patients in the Parker Group vs. 39 of 58 (67%) of patients in the Standard Group (p = 0.0497). Conclusion: When advancing an ETT over an oral fiberoptic scope and into the trachea, a Parker curved flex tip ETT is statistically more likely to be placed successfully on the first pass than is a standard ETT oriented 90° counterclockwise.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

W. Weigel and T. Dean, "A Randomized Comparison of a Parker Endotracheal Tube and a Standard Tube Oriented 90° Counterclockwise," Open Journal of Anesthesiology, Vol. 2 No. 5, 2012, pp. 219-223. doi: 10.4236/ojanes.2012.25050.

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