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HIV Prevention in Papua New Guinea: Is It Working or Not?

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DOI: 10.4236/wja.2012.23016    4,667 Downloads   7,582 Views   Citations
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ABSTRACT

Introduction: There is a global call for structural approaches to HIV that go beyond awareness and HIV testing to approach prevention work via the social and economic drivers of the epidemic. Papua New Guinea is the epicentre of the HIV epidemic in the Pacific, with an adult prevalence rate of 0.9%. Since 2004, there has been a concerted response to HIV, with vastly increased rates of HIV testing and roll-out of antiretroviral therapy, and considerable funding for HIV prevention. Objectives: While incidence is slowing there are still a considerable number of new infections each year and many commentators are worried that HIV prevention is not working in that country. This article aims to critically examine HIV prevention programs in Papua New Guinea to show whether HIV prevention is effectiveness in reaching those most vulnerable to infection. Methods: Using data from HIV prevention programs and behavioural surveys this article will assess how HIV prevention has been carried out and the effectiveness of those programs. Results: There is little evidence to indicate that HIV prevention in Papua New Guinea, particularly among those most at risk of HIV has been successful. Conclusion: there is a dearth of HIV prevention interventions in Papua New Guinea that go beyond awareness-raising to deal with the structural drivers of the epidemic.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

H. Worth, "HIV Prevention in Papua New Guinea: Is It Working or Not?," World Journal of AIDS, Vol. 2 No. 3, 2012, pp. 117-121. doi: 10.4236/wja.2012.23016.

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