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Awareness of the Potential Threat of Cyberterrorism to the National Security

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DOI: 10.4236/jis.2014.54013    4,746 Downloads   6,068 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The revolution of computing and networks could revolutionise terrorism in the same way that it has brought about changes in other aspects of life. The modern technological era has faced countries with a new set of security challenges. There are many states and potential adversaries, who have the potential and capacity in cyberspace, which makes them able to carry out cyber-attacks in the future. Some of them are currently conducting surveillance, gathering and analysis of technical information, and mapping of networks and nodes and infrastructure of opponents, which may be exploited in future conflicts. This paper uses qualitative data to develop a conceptual framework for awareness of cyberterrorism threat from the viewpoint of experts and security officials in critical infrastructure. Empirical data collected from in-depth interviews were analysed using grounded theory approach. This study applied to Saudi Arabia as a case study.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Alqahtani, A. (2014) Awareness of the Potential Threat of Cyberterrorism to the National Security. Journal of Information Security, 5, 137-146. doi: 10.4236/jis.2014.54013.

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