Share This Article:

Inquiry about Domestic Violence against Women in Healthcare Uganda: Do Practitioner Attitudes, Role Conflicts, Efficacy, Safety Concerns and Support Networks Play a Role?

Abstract Full-Text HTML Download Download as PDF (Size:271KB) PP. 630-639
DOI: 10.4236/psych.2014.57075    3,319 Downloads   4,375 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We scrutinized the extent of inquiry about domestic violence against women by practitioners in healthcare Uganda, and its relationship with individual, professional and organization factors. Specifically, we hypothesized that the frequency of IPV inquiry in healthcare would be associated with practitioner attitudes, professional role conflicts, self-efficacy, provider/client safety and system support. Methods: The Domestic Violence Healthcare Provider Survey Scale questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 376 health care providers (n = 250 valid responses) from Gulu, Anaka, Lacor and Iganga hospital situated in northern and eastern Uganda. The data was analyzed using chi-square tests, correlation tests and ordinal regressions analyses. Results and Conclusions: We found that over a three month period, the majority of participants (31%) had inquired about domestic violence exposure among clients between 4 - 6 times, with 18% having not inquired at all. As hypothesized, low self-efficacy, poor availability of a support network, high professional role conflicts/fears of offending patients, and concerns about victim/provider safety reduced the probability of IPV inquiry. These findings have implications for the reorganization of the health care settings, review of organization policy and further training of care personal before IPV inquiry can develop into a universal routine practice in healthcare Uganda.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Ehrenberg, L. , Lawoko-Olwe, W. , Loum, B. , Oketayot, K. , Akot, M. , Kiyembe, C. , Ochola, E. , Guwatudde, D. & Lawoko, S. (2014). Inquiry about Domestic Violence against Women in Healthcare Uganda: Do Practitioner Attitudes, Role Conflicts, Efficacy, Safety Concerns and Support Networks Play a Role?. Psychology, 5, 630-639. doi: 10.4236/psych.2014.57075.

References

[1] Campbell, J. (2002). Health Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence. Lancet, 359, 1331-1336.
[2] Chan, Y. H. (2005). Biostatistics 305. Multinomial Logistic Regression. Singapore Medical Journal, 46, 259-269.
[3] Emenike, E., Lawoko, S., & Dalal, K. (2008). Intimate Partner Violence and Reproductive health of Women in Kenya. International Nursing Review, 55, 97-102.
[4] Gage, A. (2005). Women’s Experience of Intimate Partner Violence in Haiti. Social Science & Medicine, 61, 343-364.
[5] Hawell, T. S., Casten, R. J., Amstrong, K. A., Dempsey, S., Coons, H. L., & Davis, M. (1998). Results of a Domestic Violence Training Program Offered to the Staff of Urban Community Health Centres. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 15, 235-242.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0749-3797(98)00070-1
[6] Hegarty, K. (2006) What Is Intimate Partner Abuse and How Common Is It? Intimate Partner Abuse and Health Professionals. New Approaches to Domestic Violence. London: Elsevier.
[7] John, I., Lawoko, S., & Svanstrom, L. (2011). Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in Healthcare in Kano, Nigeria: Extent and Determinants. Journal of Family Violence, 26, 109-116.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10896-010-9348-y
[8] John, I. A., Lawoko, S., & Oluwatosin, A. (2011). Acceptance of Screening for Intimate Partner Violence, Actual Screening and Satisfaction with Care amongst Female Clients Visiting a Health Facility in Kano, Nigeria. African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine, 3.
[9] Koziol-McLain, J., Giddings, L., Rameka, M., & Fyfe, E. (2008). Intimate Partner Violence Screening and Brief Intervention: Experiences of Women in Two New Zealand Health Care Settings. Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health, 53, 504-510.
[10] Lawoko, S., Seruwagi, G. K., Marunga, I., Mutto, M., Ochola, E., Oloya, G., Piloya, J., & Lubega, M. (2013). Healthcare Provider’s Perceptions on Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in Healthcare: A Qualitative Study of Four Health Centres in Uganda. Open Journal of Preventive Medicine, 3, 1-11.
[11] Lawoko, S., Mutto, M., & Guwatudde, D. (2012). Piloting the Domestic Violence Healthcare Providers’ Survey for Use in Uganda: Testing Factorial Structure and Reliability. Psychology, 3, 947-952.
http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/psych.2012.311142
[12] Lawoko, S., Mutto, M., & Guwatudde, D. (2012). Piloting the Domestic Violence Healthcare Providers’ Survey for Use in Uganda: Testing Factorial Structure and Reliability. Psychology, 3, 947-952.
[13] Lawoko, S., Sanz, S., Helstrom, L., & Castren, M. (2011). Screening for Intimate Partner Violence against Women in Healthcare Sweden: Prevalence and Determinants. ISRN Nursing, 2011, Article ID: 510692, 7 pages.
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/510692
[14] Lawoko, S., Seruwagi, G. K., Marunga, I., Mutto, M., Ochola, E., Oloya, G., Piloya, J., & Lubega, M. (2013). Healthcare Provider’s Perceptions on Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in Healthcare: A Qualitative Study of Four Health Centres in Uganda. Open Journal of Preventive Medicine, 3, 1-11.
http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ojpm.2013.31001
[15] Maiuro, R. D., Vitaliano, P. P., Sugg, N. K., Thompson, D. C., Rivara, F. P., & Thompson, R. S. (2000). Development of a Health Care Provider Survey for Domestic Violence: Psychometric Properties. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 19, 245-252.
[16] McCullagh, P., & Nelder, J. A. (2005). Generalized Linear Models. London: Chapman Hall.
[17] Okenwa, L., Lawoko, S., & Jansson, B. (2011). Contraception, Reproductive Health and Pregnancy Outcomes among Women Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence in Nigeria. Eur J ContraceptReprod Health Care, 16, 18-25
[18] Paluzzi, P., Gaffikin, L., & Nanda, J. (2000). The American College of Nurse-Midwives’ Domestic Violence Education Project: Evaluation and Results. Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health, 45, 384-391.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1526-9523(00)00056-8
[19] Republic of Uganda (2010). The Domestic Violence Act 2010
http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_protect/---protrav/---ilo_aids/documents/legaldocument/wcms_172625.pdf
[20] Stenson, K., Saarinen, H., Heimer, G., & Sidenvall, B. (2001). Women’s Attitudes to Being Asked about Exposure to Violence. Midwifery, 17.
[21] Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS) and Macro International Inc. (2010). Uganda Demographic and Health Survey 2011. Calverton, MD: UBOS and Macro International Inc.
[22] WHO (2013a). World Health Organization Violence Prevention Alliance: Global Campaign for Violence Prevention.
http://www.who.int/violenceprevention/approach/public_health/en/
[23] Wisner, C. L., Gilmer, T. P., Saltzman, L. E., & Zink, T. M. (1999) Intimate Partner Violence against Women: Do Victims Cost Health Plans More? The Journal of Family Practice, 48, 439-443.
[24] World Health Organization (2002). World Report on Violence and Health. Geneva: WHO.
[25] World Health Organization (WHO), London School of Hygeine, South African Medical Research Council (2013b). Global and Regional Estimates of Violence against Women: Prevalence and Health Effects of Intimate Partner Violence and Non-Partner Sexual Violence, WHO, Geneva.
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/85239/1/9789241564625_eng.pdf

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2019 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.