Share This Article:

Carbon Trade Financing Strategies and Opportunities for Competitiveness of Private Sector SMEs in Uganda

Abstract Full-Text HTML Download Download as PDF (Size:218KB) PP. 244-251
DOI: 10.4236/ti.2012.34034    4,165 Downloads   7,035 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Availability of strategies and opportunities can drive SMEs competitive investment potential. In Uganda, several SMEs are emerging and their activities are having huge environmental impact hence contributing to global warming in form of carbon-dioxide release. There has been less effort to create awareness among public and private enterprises with an aim of reducing these negative effects. For example, water risks are rampant today, given population and climate change trends (www.ceres.org/), the demand for primary energy is projected to increase globally by a factor of 1.6 to 3.5 by the year 2050. Among developing countries, these factors are increasing from 2.3 to 5.2 (World Bank 2007). This study assessed corporate carbon financing strategies and competitiveness of small and Medium Enterprises with different management practices in Uganda. We used correlation analysis to find out whether there is significant relationship between company factors and competitiveness. The findings indicated Pearson correlation r = 0.435.The result of 0.435** was found to be higher than the Pearson product–moment correlation coefficient critical values of 0.361. This revealed that there was a positive and statistically significant relationship between Company factors and competitiveness of SMEs.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

S. Kalimunjaye, M. Olobo and S. Kyakulumbye, "Carbon Trade Financing Strategies and Opportunities for Competitiveness of Private Sector SMEs in Uganda," Technology and Investment, Vol. 3 No. 4, 2012, pp. 244-251. doi: 10.4236/ti.2012.34034.

References

[1] Ministry of Finance Planning and Economic Development, “Uganda’s Draft Micro Small and Medium Enterprises Policy and Strategy,” 2007.
[2] C. Headland, “Has the Debate on Climate Change Affected Institutional Investment Behaviour,” Headland Consultancy Report, Headland Consultancy Company, London, 2007.
[3] M. Karavai, “Conceptualizations of Sustainability in the Context of Voluntary Carbon Market,” Master of Science thesis, Lund University, Paradisgatan, 2009.
[4] S. Solomon, et al., “Technical Summary,” Working Group I: The Physical Science Basis, IPCC Fourth Assessment Report: Climate Change, 2007.
[5] http://www.oecd.org/
[6] International Labor Organization, “The International Labor Organization’s Database on Small Enterprise Definitions, Policies, Laws and Regulations BASIS,” In: Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge and New York, 2011.
[7] A. Bigsten and K. Mugerwa, “Is Uganda an Emerging Economy?” Department of Economics, G?teborg University, G?teborg, 1999.
[8] M. Kavindra, “Success Factors For Knowledge Management,” Master Thesis, International Business Management & Consulting, University of Applied Sciences, Kempten, 2004.
[9] S. Gwali, “Taxonomic Diversity, Distinctness, and Abundance of Tree and Shrub Species in Kasagala Forest Reserve in Uganda: Implications for Management and Conservation Policy Decisions,” Tropical Conservation Science, Vol. 3, No. 3, 2011, pp. 319-333.
[10] Y. C. Wen, “The Study on the Status and the Countermeasures of Low-Carbon Financial System of China, 2010. http://www.scirp.org/journal/lce
[11] M. Karavai, “Conceptualizations of Sustainability in the Context of Voluntary Carbon Market,” Master of Science thesis, Lund University, Paradisgatan, 2009.
[12] Shell Spring Board and Vivid Economics, “Opportunities for Innovation. The Business Opportunities for SMEs in Tackling the Causes of Climate Change,” 2006. http://sd-cite.iisd.org/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=36019
[13] The Spores, “Post Harvest Management Adding Value to Crops,” 2011. http://spore.cta.int/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&lang=en&id=1670&catid=9
[14] J. Lopez, “Business should Lead against Climate Change, the Star,” 2010. http://biz.thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2010/1/14/business/5466364&sec=business
[15] F. Bettina, et al., “Banking & Climate Change—Opportunities and Risks,” An Analysis of Climate Strategies in More than 100 Banks Worldwide, Eidgen?ssische Technische Hochschule, Zurich, 2009, p. 19.
[16] S. Shames and S. J. Scherr, “Institutional Models for Carbon Finance to Mobilize Sustainable Agricultural Development in Africa,” Co-Agriculture Partners, Washington, 2010, pp. 12-13.
[17] F. Bettina, et al., “Banking & Climate Change—Opportunities and Risks,” An Analysis of Climate Strategies in more than 100 Banks Worldwide, Eidgen?ssische Technische Hochschule, Zurich, 2009, p. 14.
[18] Uganda National Road Authority, “The Road Magazine Gayaza-Zirobwe Road Nearing Completion,” Monthly Publication Issue 003, Uganda National Road Authority, 2010.
[19] United Nations Environment Program Finance Initiative, “Finance Initiative, Innovative Financing for Sustainability,” 2007. http://www.unepfi.org/
[20] P. Turyakira, “A Competitive Strategy for Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Uganda,” Proceedings of the 10th Annual Ben-Africa Conference, Nairobi, 30 August1 September, 2010.
[21] M. Karavai, “Conceptualizations of Sustainability in the Context of Voluntary Carbon Market,” M.Sc Thesis, Lund University, Paradisgatan, 2009.

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2019 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.