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Marcus-Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome and Gustatory Sweating in Long Standing Poorly Controlled Diabetes: A Case Report

DOI: 10.4236/ijcm.2012.31008    4,304 Downloads   7,020 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Marcus Gunn jaw winking syndrome (MGJWS) is a rare congenital disorder belonging to the synkinetic eye movement group of disorders observed in children. It occurrence in adults and patients with diabetes has not been reported. Material and Methods: A 64 year man with poorly controlled diabetes of 18 years presented with 3 month history of jaw winking on the left side along with gustatory sweating, which was managed conservatively. There was spontaneous improvement in jaw wink at 4 months of follow up. Conclusions: Acquired causes of MGJWS are not known. This is probably the first report of this syndrome occurring at such a late age. Long standing poorly controlled diabetes may have had some role in the development of jaw winking in this patient.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

D. Dutta, I. Maisnam, S. Ghosh, P. Mukhopadhyay, S. Mukhopadhyay and S. Chowdhury, "Marcus-Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome and Gustatory Sweating in Long Standing Poorly Controlled Diabetes: A Case Report," International Journal of Clinical Medicine, Vol. 3 No. 1, 2012, pp. 40-42. doi: 10.4236/ijcm.2012.31008.

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