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J. L. Greene and A. C. Bovell-Benjamin, “Macroscopic and Sensory Evaluation of Bread Supplemented with Sweet Potato Flour,” Journal of Food Science, Vol. 69, No. 4, 2004, pp. 167-173.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Effect of Moringa oleifera Leaf Powder Supplementation on Some Quality Characteristics of Wheat Bread

    AUTHORS: Abraham I. Sengev, Joseph O. Abu, Dick I. Gernah

    KEYWORDS: Bread; Moringa Leaf Powder; β-Carotene; Physical Properties; Sensory Properties; Supplementation

    JOURNAL NAME: Food and Nutrition Sciences, Vol.4 No.3, March 19, 2013

    ABSTRACT: The effect of Moringa oleifera leaf powder supplementation on some physico-chemical and sensory properties of wheat bread was determined. Bread was prepared from varying proportions of 100%, 99%, 98%, 97%, 96% and 95% wheat flour supplemented with 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% Moringa oleifera leaf powder respectively. The bread samples were allowed to cool at ambient temperature (30℃± 1℃) and analysed for some physical properties, proximate composition, and sensory attributes. Moringa leaf powder addition significantly (p % to 3.28%), ash (1.10% to 1.65%), protein (9.07% to 13.97%), and ether extract (1.51% to 2.59%), while decreasing moisture content (35.20% to 27.65%). Moringa leaf powder supplementation also significantly (p cm3, 32.32 to 25.65 g, 7.00 to 5.83 cm and 4.70 to 2.65 cm3/g respectively, while the loaf weight increased from 169.20 to 185.86 g. There was a significant (p mg/100g and 0.02 to 3.27 mg/100g respectively, while Iron (Fe) and Cupper (Cu) contents decreased from 2.74 to 1.25 mg/100g and 2.26 to 0.03 mg/100g respectively. Sensory evaluation showed that although there was significant (p Moringa supplementation. This implies that despite the high nutrient content of Moringa oleifera powder, it is not a good substitute for wheat in bread production due to its physical characteristics and sensory attributes.