Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Contact Us >>

WhatsApp  +86 18163351462(WhatsApp)
   
Paper Publishing WeChat
Book Publishing WeChat
(or Email:book@scirp.org)

Article citations

More>>

Partridge, B.L. (1982) Structure and function of fish schools. Scientific American, 246, 114-123. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0682-114

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: The lateral neck radiograph for an impacted fish bone in the aero-digestive tract: Going back to basics

    AUTHORS: Dushyant Shetty, David AT Gay

    KEYWORDS: Digital Radiography; Radio-Opacity; Fish Bones

    JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Vol.5 No.12A, December 31, 2012

    ABSTRACT: Aim: To evaluate the radioopacity of fish bones from a number of species using digital radiography in order to establish whether advances in acquisition and interpretative techniques have affected the radiologist’s ability to detect impacted fish bones. Methods: The bones from six species of fish commonly consumed in the United Kingdom were radiographed using a soft tissue neck phantom by means of a digital radiographic X-ray tube. The images were looked at by 15 radiology consultants and registrars who determined whether the bones were visible or not using General Electric (GE) PACS workstations. Results: The radio-graphed bones from all six species of fish were visible by all 15 (100%) radiology registrars and consultants. Conclusion: Digital radiogramphy and modern PACS workstations have meant that fish bones can be visualized irrespective of species. The lateral neck radiograph therefore may still have an important role in the investigation of impacted fish bones in the aerodigestive tract.