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Obermair, A., Roller, S., Crandon, A.J., Perrin, L. and Nicklin, J.L. (2001) Primary bartholin gland carcinoma: A report of seven cases. ANZJOG, 41, 78-81.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Bartholin’s Gland Carcinomas: A 20 plus-year experience from Queensland

    AUTHORS: Ian S. C. Jones, Alex Crandon, Karen Sanday

    KEYWORDS: Bartholin’s Gland Carcinomas; Cancer; Diagnosis; Management; Outcome; Follow Up

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol.2 No.4, November 20, 2012

    ABSTRACT: Objective: To review the records of cases of Bartholin’s Gland Carcinoma referred to the Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer (QCGC) between mid 1993 and mid 2012. Methods: Bartholin’s Gland Carcinoma case data from QCGC were reviewed and analysed using the computer software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 11.0. Results: Of the 12 cases four died of their disease, seven are still alive and disease free and one is alive with recurrent disease. The mean age at diagnosis was 52.8 years. Time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis averaged 5.8 months. All diagnoses were confirmed histologically. Presenting symptoms included a lump and pain. The most common presenting complaint was a lump. Treatment included surgical excision, occasional biopsy followed by radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. In some cases radiation and chemotherapy was followed by vulvectomy of various extent. Conclusions: Bartholin’s Gland Carcinoma is a rare condition with outcome dependent on duration of symptoms, including delay in diagnosis, cell-type, cellular differentiation and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification. A Bartholin’s gland mass in a woman aged 40 years or more should be considered malignant until a biopsy proves otherwise.The incidence of Bartholin’s Gland Carcinoma in Queensland is less than that reported elsewhere but a higher proportion of squamous cell carcinomas was found in this small series.