SCIRP Mobile Website
Paper Submission

Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Contact Us >>

WhatsApp  +86 18163351462(WhatsApp)
   
Paper Publishing WeChat
Book Publishing WeChat
(or Email:book@scirp.org)

Article citations

More>>

(1993) A Predictive Model for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. The International Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Prognostic Factors Project. New England Journal of Medicine, 329, 987-994.
https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199309303291402

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: The Lower Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte to Monocyte Ratio Following Completion of First Line Chemotherapy Is a Risk Factor for Predicting Relapse in Patients with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    AUTHORS: Ghada Ezzat Eladawei, Sheref Mohamed El-Taher

    KEYWORDS: Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma, Absolute Lymphocyte Count/Absolute Monocyte Count Ratio, Relapse, Follow up

    JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Cancer Therapy, Vol.10 No.1, January 23, 2019

    ABSTRACT: Background and objective: During routine follow up, there is no specific predictor to ascertain relapse after standard first line chemotherapy in diffuse large cell lymphoma. Therefore, this study was designed to assess the prognostic significance of the ratio between absolute lymphocyte and monocyte counts (LMR) in the peripheral blood to verify relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Patients and methods: A total of 139 patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) were evaluated and treated with CHOP or R-CHOP between the years 2009 and 2016. Three months following completion of first line therapy, Lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR) was calculated from the routine automated complete blood cell count (CBC) attained a plateau after the bone marrow recovery after first line chemotherapy. The absolute lymphocyte count/absolute monocyte count ratio (LMR) was calculated by dividing the ALC by the AMC. Results: ROC curve analysis of 139 patients established 2.8 as cutoff point of LMR for relapse with AUC of 0.97 (95% CI 0.93 - 0.99, P ≤ 0.001). Cox regression analysis was performed to identify factors predicting relapse. In univariate regression analysis, ALC (95% CI 0.003 - 0.03, p ≤ 0.001), AMC (95% CI 15.4 - 128.8, p ≤ 0.001), LMR (95% CI 0.001 - 0.01, p ≤ 0.001), and LDH (95% CI 0.1 - 0.5, p ≤ 0.001) following completion of therapy are significant factors for relapse. Other significant factors for relapse are Ann Arbor stage (95% CI 1.1 - 6.9, P = 0.03), extranodal sites (95% CI 1.2 - 6.1, P = 0.01), age (95% CI 1.3 - 6.5, P = 0.01) and treatment of CHOP protocol (95% CI 0.05 - 0.6, P = 0.007). In a multivariate analysis LMR following completion of therapy was predictive for relapse (95% CI 0.001 - 0.2, P = 0.005). ALC was also significant in multivariate analysis (95% CI 0.01 - 0.8, P = 0.03). LDH following completion of therapy (95% CI 0.2 - 14.9, P = 0.5), AMC following completion of therapy (95% CI 0.3 - 43.1, P = 0.3), age (95% CI 0.9 - 205.4, P = 0.06), extra-nodal sites (95% CI 0.04 - 9.8, P = 0.8), Ann Arbor stage (95% CI 0.3 - 28.7, P = 0.3), and Treatment of CHOP protocol (95% CI 0.01 - 2.4, P = 0.2) were not statistically significant. Conclusion: This study observed that LMR assessed after first line chemotherapy during routine follow up is an independent predictor of relapse and clinical outcome in DLBCL patients. LMR at follow up can be used a simple inexpensive biomarker to alert clinicians for relapse during follow up after standard first line chemotherapy in DLBCL patients.