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Maniscalco, B., et al. (2011) Metrology of Silicon Photovoltaic Cells Using Coherence Correlation Interferometry Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC), 37th IEEE.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Characterisation of Thin Films Using a Coherence Scanning Interferometry

    AUTHORS: Yang Yu, Daniel Mansfield

    KEYWORDS: Film Thickness, CCI, Thick Film, HCF

    JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Vol.3 No.1, January 20, 2015

    ABSTRACT: Accurate measurement of film thickness and its uniformity are very important to the performance of many coated surfaces and for many applications are critical. Effective inspection of the film thickness and uniformity is the key to high performance. Conventionally, film thickness is meas- ured using a spectrophotometer/reflectometer, ellipsometer or a physical step measurement; however, these techniques all have limitations. Coherence Scanning Interferometry (CSI) is an established method to measure surface topography as this technique offers many advantages such as speed, ease of use and accuracy. The measurement of “thick” films (exceeding ~1.5 μm) which gives rise to clearly separate fringe bunches is a well-established CSI capability. However, a methodology known as the ‘helical complex field’ (HCF) [1] [2] function allows film thickness to be measured down to ~25 nm. This new method, combined with Coherence Correlation Interferometry (CCI) [3] offers film thickness measurements with sub-nanometre vertical resolution and ~1 μm lateral resolution. It is ideally suited for detailed analysis of coated optical surfaces. In this paper, the fundamentals of the techniques are described and some case studies are presented.