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M. W. Abbott and R. A. Volberg, “The New Zealand National Survey of Problem and Pathological Gambling,” Journal of Gambling Studies, Vol. 12, No. 2, 1996, pp. 143-160.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Taiwanese Gambling Behaviors, Perceptions, and Attitudes

    AUTHORS: Cheng-Wei Chung, Jiun-Jia Hsu, Che Hao Chang

    KEYWORDS: Casino Gambling; Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI); Behavior; Perception; Attitude

    JOURNAL NAME: American Journal of Industrial and Business Management, Vol.3 No.1, January 22, 2013

    ABSTRACT: This study categorizes different Taiwanese gambling types using Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI), and further evaluates the perceptions and attitudes toward the legalization of casino gambling. A survey was conducted using convenient sampling and distributed by Internet. Results indicate that across groups of different types of gamblers, there are significant differences in perceptions toward the legalized casino gambling industry; and there are significant differences in attitudes toward legalized casino gambling. Additionally, there are significant differences between perceptions toward the legalized casino gambling industry, and attitudes toward the legalization of casino gambling. In general, non-gamblers are relatively more conservative toward the development of the casino gaming industry due to non-gam- blers’ sensitivity toward the involvement of the economic and social costs involved in investing in this particular indus- try. In addition, the results of this study provide the Taiwangovernment with information about Taiwanese gambling behaviors and opinions toward newly legalized gambling. By understandingTaiwanresidents’ gambling behaviors, perceptions, and attitudes prior to the opening of the casinos, this study could benefitTaiwansociety and maximize the benefits and minimize the costs associate with the development of the casino industry.