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Kamo, T., Kamo, K., Nakadaira, S., & Sakamoto, K. (1993). A Investigation of seasonality in mood and behavior in normal subjects using the seasonal pattern assessment questionnaire. Japanese Journal of Psychiatry, 35, 837-840.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Seasonal Mood and Behavioral Changes for Japanese Residents in the United Kingdom

    AUTHORS: Yumiko Kurata, Shinobu Nomura

    KEYWORDS: Seasonality; Seasonal Change; Depression

    JOURNAL NAME: Psychology, Vol.3 No.9A, September 26, 2012

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate seasonal changes in mood and behavior for Japanese residents in UK A questionnaire survey was conducted with Japanese residents in the UK (n = 100) who participated both a combination winter and summer research. First, a longitudinal study comparing two surveys—one in summer and another in winter—was carried out to determine how the level of seasonal changes influenced depression among Japanese living in the UK. Then, we examined seasonal changes in mood and behavior over a 12-month period based on the degree of seasonal dependence. Paired t-tests on Global Seasonality Score (GSS score) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) scores by winter and summer demonstrated that each score had a significant seasonal difference; individual scores were higher in winter than in summer. We examined the difference between high seasonality group, medium seasonal group, and non-seasonal group, regarding to the winter CES-D and summer CES-D scores. The ANOVA revealed a significant difference on the winter score (Winter: F(2,97) = 4.62, p