SCIRP Mobile Website
Paper Submission

Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Contact Us >>

WhatsApp  +86 18163351462(WhatsApp)
   
Paper Publishing WeChat
Book Publishing WeChat
(or Email:book@scirp.org)

Article citations

More>>

Robinson, J.L., Seal, R.F., Spady, D.W. and Joffres, M.R. (1998) Comparison of Esophageal, Rectal, Axillary, Bladder, Tympanic, and Pulmonary Artery Temperatures in Children. Journal of Pediatrics, 133, 553-556.
https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3476(98)70067-8

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Optimization of the Recommended Time for Rectal Temperature Measurement in Children: An Observational Study

    AUTHORS: Qian Zhao, Yanwei Li, Leshan Zhou

    KEYWORDS: Fever, Mercury Thermometer, Pediatrics, Rectal Temperature

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Pediatrics, Vol.9 No.2, May 29, 2019

    ABSTRACT: Background: This study aimed to determine the optimum time required to measure rectal temperature in children with mercury-in-glass thermometers. Methods: This cross-sectional observational study involved a random sample of pediatric patients ≤5 years of age. Body temperature was measured for 3 - 5 minutes using standard mercury-in-glass rectal thermometers. Outcomes were rectal body temperatures at 1, 2, and 3 minutes until reaching a stable rectal temperature, and the final rectal temperature. Results: This study recruited 120 children. Mean time to reach a stable rectal temperature was 1.8 minutes (range: 30 seconds to five minutes). 90% of pediatric patients’ temperature came out within ±0.1°C of the final temperature at two minutes. There was no correlation between the time taken to reach a stable rectal temperature and age, body weight, gender, or the final temperature. Conclusion: Mercury-in-glass thermometers can be used to obtain accurate rectal temperature measurements at two minutes in routine pediatric practice.