SCIRP Mobile Website
Paper Submission

Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Contact Us >>

WhatsApp  +86 18163351462(WhatsApp)
   
Paper Publishing WeChat
Book Publishing WeChat
(or Email:book@scirp.org)

Article citations

More>>

Zhou, M. (2016). A Revisit of General Self-Efficacy Scale: Uni- or Multi-Dimensional? Current Psychology: A Journal for Diverse Perspectives on Diverse Psychological Issues, 35, 427-436. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-015-9311-4

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Using MIMIC Modeling to Identify Dimensions of Self-Regulation in Cerebral Palsy

    AUTHORS: Ioannis Agaliotis, Panagiotis Varsamis

    KEYWORDS: ICF-CY, Goal-Setting, Self-Evaluation, Path Analysis, Special Education

    JOURNAL NAME: Psychology, Vol.10 No.6, May 14, 2019

    ABSTRACT: As long as physical disability is considered in terms of a continuous, dynamic, and dialectical relationship among personal and environmental factors, task characteristics will play an important role. The main purpose of this study is to confirm levels of motivation and self-regulation in students with Cerebral Palsy when confronted with an adapted ball throwing task. Using the dynamic approach of Self-Regulated Learning, a theory-driven Multiple Indicators and Multiple Causes model was eventually qualified. It comprised four levels of functioning, namely goal-setting, motor performance, efficacy beliefs, and self-reflections. These facets were greatly influenced by intellectual functions, hand functions, initial goals, coping self-efficacy, and throwing distance. Results underscore the role of disability and personal factors. Further research should expand on personal characteristics and focus on the longitudinal, i.e., developmental, examination for the proposed causal effects.