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Van Graan, A., et al. (2016) Professional Nurses’ Understanding of Clinical Judgment: A Contextual Inquiry. Health SA Gesondheid, 21, 280-293.
https://doi.org/10.4102/hsag.v21i0.967

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Practice Rationale Care Model: The Art and Science of Clinical Reasoning, Decision Making and Judgment in the Nursing Process

    AUTHORS: Jefferson Garcia Guerrero

    KEYWORDS: Clinical Reasoning, Decision Making, Judgement, Practice Rationale, Competency

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Nursing, Vol.9 No.2, February 14, 2019

    ABSTRACT: Nurses must be enlightened that clinical reasoning, clinical decision making, and clinical judgement are the key elements in providing safe patient care. It must be incorporated and applied all throughout the nursing process. The impact of patients’ positive outcomes relies on how nurses are effective in clinical reasoning and put into action once clinical decision making occurs. Thus, nurses with poor clinical reasoning skills frequently fail to see and notice patient worsening condition, and misguided decision making arises that leads to ineffective patient care and adding patients suffering. Clinical judgment on the other hand denotes on the outcome after the cycle of clinical reasoning. Within this context, nurses apply reflection about their actions from the clinical decision making they made. The process of applying knowledge, skills and expertise in the clinical field through clinical reasoning is the work of art in the nursing profession in promoting patient safety in the course of delivering routine nursing interventions. Nurses must be guided with their sound clinical reasoning to have an optimistic outcome and prevent iatrogenic harm to patients. Nurses must be equipped with knowledge, skills, attitude and values but most importantly prepared to face the bigger picture of responsibility to care for every patient in the clinical field.