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Schneider, S.K. and Northcraft, G.B. (1999) Three Social Dilemmas of Workforce Diversity in Organizations: A Social Identity Perspective. Human Relations, 52, 1445-1467.
https://doi.org/10.1177/001872679905201105

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Let’s Be Friends: National Homophily in Multicultural Newcomer Student Networks

    AUTHORS: Kishore Gopalakrishna Pillai, Constantinos N. Leonidou, Xuemei Bian

    KEYWORDS: Homophily, Newcomer Networks, Interpersonal Relationships, Nationality

    JOURNAL NAME: Social Networking, Vol.8 No.1, December 21, 2018

    ABSTRACT: Understanding the relational and network dynamics among newcomer networks is important to devising appropriate strategies that will maximize the productivity of the incoming workforce. Nevertheless, there are limited empirical contributions on newcomer networks with few studies examining newcomer networks in international environments. This study focuses on national homophily and examines whether ethnic identity salience, self-efficacy, individualism and ethnocentrism are associated with the occurrence of national homophily in newcomers networks. Using a multicultural student sample drawn from newly formed networks, the study found that ethnic identity salience and academic self-efficacy are associated with national homophily positively and negatively, respectively. Individualism is not found to be related to homophily while, contrary to our hypothesis, ethnocentrism is found to be negatively related to homophily. Through its examination of the effect of attitudinal variables on homophily, this study contributes to the broader literature on homophily and provides implications for managers and researchers.