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BREE (2012) Australian Household Energy Consumption 2000-01-2010-11, Australian Energy Statistics Data—Table F.
http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4102.0Main+Features10Sep+2012

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: A Comparison of Residential Energy Demand Behaviour in Britain and Australia

    AUTHORS: Sven Hallin, Thomas Weyman-Jones

    KEYWORDS: Energy Policy, Behavioural Economics, Australia UK Comparison, Sustainable Energy

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Energy Efficiency, Vol.7 No.4, December 5, 2018

    ABSTRACT: This research highlights an interesting finding comparing energy use in the residential sector in the United Kingdom and Australia. Energy consumed per capita is largely similar, however the energy available is manifestly different. Australia is blessed with a greater abundance of energy than the United Kingdom. Particularly, in the main area of study in Australia, Victoria state, Brown coal is easy and cheap to access. It is therefore politically more difficult to argue that the population affords more expensive sustainable energy resources even though Australia is one of the countries that can readily produce this type of energy. Britain, however, is a net importer of energy. A large proportion of this energy is natural gas which is a fossil fuel, and therefore contributes to the negative effects of climate change. The findings of this research focus on what motivates residential users of energy to use energy more sustainably. It presents the conclusions of previous research as a backdrop, and reveals the complexity of occupant behaviour. Key drivers are financial incentives and the role of large organisations such as governments in influ-encing behaviour. This may take significant time.