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World Health Organization (2012a). Depression: A Global Crisis.
http://www.who.int/mental_health/management/depression/wf
mh_paper_depression_wmhd_2012.pdf

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Development and Validation of the Japanese-Translated Version of the Multiple-Choice Questionnaire of Depression Literacy (MCQ-DL)

    AUTHORS: Jun Kashihara, Shinji Sakamoto

    KEYWORDS: Depression, Mental Health Literacy, Depression Literacy, Validation, Japan

    JOURNAL NAME: Psychology, Vol.9 No.11, October 12, 2018

    ABSTRACT: Although depression literacy plays a key role in encouraging people with depression to seek professional treatment, there exist no measures of depression literacy in Japan that are comparable to those validated in English-speaking countries. The present study therefore developed and validated a Japanese-translated version of the Multiple-Choice Questionnaire of Depression Literacy (MCQ-DL), which is rated as being of high quality by recent systematic reviews. We conducted an online two-wave survey (NT1 = 325, NT2 = 180) and examined the psychometric properties of the full-item (27 items) and short (10 items) versions of the Japanese-translated MCQ-DL. Results provide several points of validity evidence for both versions as measures that capture individuals’ depression literacy profiles: 1) one-factor structures of these versions were supported by the data; and 2) the items used in both versions had a variety of difficulty and discrimination indices. Results also indicate several limitations of the Japanese-translated MCQ-DL for use in correlation-based and multivariate analyses: 1) internal consistencies seem insufficient (α = .68) and poor (α = .28) for the full-item and short versions, respectively; 2) the test-retest reliability was insufficient for the short version (r = .51, p r| ≤ .22) with the other variables, including stigmatizing attitudes toward, and familiarity with, people with depression and components of empathy. The discussion highlights the usage of and further room for the validation of the Japanese-translated MCQ-DL we developed.