SCIRP Mobile Website
Paper Submission

Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Contact Us >>

WhatsApp  +86 18163351462(WhatsApp)
   
Paper Publishing WeChat
Book Publishing WeChat
(or Email:book@scirp.org)

Article citations

More>>

Pleissner, D., Lam, W.C., Sun, Z. and Lin, C.S. (2013) Food Waste as Nutrient Source in Heterotrophic Microalgae Cultivation. Bioresource Technology, 137, 139-146. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2013.03.088

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Utilization of Vegetable Waste Juice by Purple Non-Sulfur Bacterium (Afifella marina Strain ME) for Biomass Production

    AUTHORS: Sujjat Al Azad, Wong Hao Jie, M. T. B. M. Lal

    KEYWORDS: Afifella marina, Vegetable Waste Juice, Dry Cell Weight and Carotenoid Production

    JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Geoscience and Environment Protection, Vol.6 No.5, May 25, 2018

    ABSTRACT: This experiment was conducted to determine the possibility of utilization of vegetable waste juice in the production of purple non-sulfur bacterium Afifella marina biomass. Bacterium was cultured in four diluted such as, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% (v/v) vegetable waste juices. In addition synthetic 112 media were used as control to compare the growth characteristics of Afifella marine. The bacterium Afifella marina grew well in 10% diluted vegetable waste juice in anaerobic light condition with the highest production of 5.02 g/l dry cell weight in fifth day of culture, whereas the highest total carotenoid production of 0.87 mg/g dry cell weight was recorded in third day of culture. The highest dry cell weight productions recorded in 10% of VWJ was significantly higher compared to four other treatments (F = 14.63; p = 0.00). However, the total carotenoid production of bacteria in 10% VWJ showed no significant difference compared to the carotenoid production in 112 synthetic media, but was significantly higher compared to three other treatments (P = 0.00). The bacterium, Afifella marina has the ability to use vegetable waste juice at certain level for the production of bacterial biomass.