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Bell, I., Baldwin, C., Russek, L., Schwartz, G. and Hardin, E. (1998) Early Life Stress, Negative Paternal Relationships, and Chemical Intolerance in Middle Aged Women: Support for a Neural Sensitization Model. Journal Women’s Health, 7, 1135-1149.
https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.1998.7.1135

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Indoor Air Mycological Survey and Occupational Exposure in Libraries in Mato Grosso-Central Region—Brazil

    AUTHORS: Diniz Pereira Leite Júnior, Ronaldo Sousa Pereira, Washington Santos de Almeida, Sara de Almeida Alves Simões, Ana Caroline Akeme Yamamoto, Janaina Vasconcellos Ribeiro de Souza, Evelin Rodrigues Martins, Fábio Alexandre Leal dos Santos, Rosane Christine Hahn

    KEYWORDS: Biological Hazards, Library Collections, Anemophilous Fungi, Indoor Air Quality

    JOURNAL NAME: Advances in Microbiology, Vol.8 No.4, April 30, 2018

    ABSTRACT: Background: Indoor air quality in environments where there is great circulation of people, posing risks to the health of its occupants, including allergic problems, infections and contaminations, can be aided by climatic factors, chemicals and biological agents housed in these environments, influencing the location and providing favorable conditions for the degradation of bibliographic collections. The present study investigated the presence of fungi in indoor environments in seven public and private libraries in the central region of Brazil, Mato Grosso, and verified the impact on occupational health. Results: A total of 26,194 fungal specimens were isolated from 342 dust samples collected using three techniques: Andersen’s sampler (12.3%), exposure plate dish (25.1%) and sterile swab (62.6%). A total of 184 fungal species were identified: 156 (84.8%) mycelial fungi and 28 (15.2%) yeast fungi, belonging 54 fungal genera, 43 (79.6%) mycelial fungi and 11 (20.4%) yeast fungi. The genus Aspergillus (40.6%) was one of the main fungi present in indoor air. Aspergillus niger (12.3%) was identified as the most prevalent species in literary environments, followed by Cryptococcus spp. (7.1%) and Cladosporium cladosporioides (7.0%). In relation to seasonal distribution, there was a greater fungal isolation in the dry season (54%); followed by the rainy season (46%). Conclusion: These results suggest the substrates researched in the evaluated environments presented in the form of documents, books and papers associated with dust and air humidity become suitable for microbiological proliferation. These findings highlight the importance of minimizing the risk of exposure to fungal agents, identified in pathogenic and toxigenic microenvironments in library collections.