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Schachter, M., Raziel, A., Friedler, S., Strassburger, D., Bern, O. and Ron-El, R. (2003) Insulin Resistance in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Is Associated with Elevated Plasma Homocysteine. Human Reproduction, 18, 721-727.
https://doi.org/10.1093/humrep/deg190

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: The Effects of Plasma Homocysteine in PCOS Women: A Review

    AUTHORS: Pranita Maharjan, Peng Dan Hong

    KEYWORDS: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Homocysteine, Insulin Resistance

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol.8 No.1, January 15, 2018

    ABSTRACT: Homocysteine is an intermediate substance formed during the breakdown of the amino acid methionine and may undergo remethylation to methionine or trans-sulfuration to cystathionine or cysteine. The metabolism occurs via two pathways: remethylation to methionine, which requires folate and vitamin B12; and transsulfuration to cystathionine, which requires pyridoxal-5’-phosphate. The disturbances in the metabolic pathways lead to the accumulation of Hcy, either by insufficient transsulfuration (through CBS mutations or vitamin B6 deficiency) or by a blockage of remethylation. In the latter case, folate or vitamin B12 deficiency may be involved, as well as MTHFR. High levels of Hcy induce sustained injury of arterial endothelial cells, proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells and enhance activity of key participants in vascular inflammation, atherogenesis, and vulnerability of the established atherosclerotic plaque. Hyperhomocysteinemia has become the topic of interest in recent years. It has been highly associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disorders, such as, atherosclerosis, thromboembolism and dyslipidemia. Women with PCOS show constellation of metabolic syndromes. Obesity, hyperandrogenemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the hallmark of PCOS which later becomes the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Various studies had revealed the presence of increased Hcy level in PCOS women which may or may not be associated with other biochemical parameters. Intense treatment for PCOS can influence homocysteine levels.