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Roberts, J. A. (1978) Hypnosis by Telephone. Medical Journal of Australia, 2, 158-160.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Experimental Approach to the Transmission of Information in Hypnosis

    AUTHORS: Edoardo Casiglia, Federica Albertini, Valérie Tikhonoff, Federica Gasparotti, Jacopo Favaro, Francesco Finatti, Panagiota Rempelou, Antonio Maria Lapenta, Paolo Spinella

    KEYWORDS: Hypnosis, Information, Communication, Hemodynamics, Rapport

    JOURNAL NAME: Psychology, Vol.9 No.1, January 10, 2018

    ABSTRACT: The means by which information can be transmitted in hypnosis are debated. Aim of this pilot study was to induce and maintain hypnosis without the hypnotist and the subject being in the same room. In other words, we wanted to clarify, using measurable outcomes, if the hypnotic message could be conveyed through an electronic device. We studied 6 young healthy highly hypnotizable volunteers. After a session aimed at creating the rapport, each participant underwent an experimental session consisting in the execution of a cold pressor test (CTP) in basal awake condition, during hypnotic focused analgesia in the presence of the hypnotist (HFA-P) and during hypnotic focused analgesia suggested via transceiver (HFA-R). Cardiovascular monitoring was performed throughout the session. Perceived pain intensity and hemodynamic parameters during the CPT (baseline, 1st minute, end of the test) in the three phases of the experimental session were compared with paired t-test. During both HFA-P and HFA-R, perceived pain was nullified. The times of permanence in icy water significantly increased in comparison to non-hypnotic condition by 369.2% in HFA-P and by 394.3% in HFA-R. The systolic blood pressure × heart rate product increased in non-hypnotic conditions (+27.8%, p st minute; +35.3%, p = 0.01, at the end) but not during HFA-P (-1% and -0.2%, NS) or HFA-R (+7.3% and -1.6%, NS). In conclusion, hypnosis induced and maintained via transceiver was equivalent to that in the presence of the hypnotist. The hypnotic information therefore turned out to be more important than the means chosen to transmit it.