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Crooks, C.V., Scott, K., Ellis, W. and Wolfe, D.A. (2011) Impact of a Universal School-Based Violence Prevention Program on Violent Delinquency: Distinctive Benefits for Youth with Maltreatment Histories. Child Abuse & Neglect, 35, 393-400.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2011.03.002

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Results of Dating Violence Prevention Education for Japanese High School Boys

    AUTHORS: Tomoko Suga

    KEYWORDS: DV, Prevention Program, Boys High School Students in Japan

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.5 No.12, December 26, 2017

    ABSTRACT: We conducted a class on domestic violence (DV) prevention for 234 high school boys (intervention group: 154 boys, non-intervention group: 80 boys) and verified its effect on the boys. The program dealt with respect, relationships and types of violence. The factor analysis of a questionnaire survey conducted before the class on DV prevention revealed that the high school boys’ understanding of “a relationship” and “a coercive behavior” was weak. Therefore, after conducting the class on DV prevention, we tested whether there was an improvement in their understanding of the terms “relationship” and “coercive behavior”. To understand whether boys’ understanding of “relationships” showed any change after the class, a comparison of the intervention and the non-intervention groups was carried out at four different time points—before the class on DV prevention, after the class, after a month, and after six months. A 2-factorial analysis of variance (repeated measures) was conducted. The results revealed that no mutual points of interaction were seen with the different measurement times based on the presence or absence of intervention (F (3,696) = 0.995, n.s.). To understand whether the term “coercive behaviors” changed boys’ understanding of the term after the class, the comparison from the results before the class till six months later showed significant mutual interactions with the measurement times based on the presence or absence of intervention (F (3,696) = 4.48, p