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Einarsen, S., Aasland, M.S. and Skogstad, A. (2007) Destructive Leadership Behavior: A Definition and Conceptual Model. The Leadership Quarterly, 18, 207-216.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Student’s Perception of Missed Care: Focus Group Results

    AUTHORS: Mary Kalfoss

    KEYWORDS: Missed Nursing Care, Suboptimal Care, Noncaring, Focus g Groups, Nursing, Pastoral Counseling

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Nursing, Vol.7 No.7, July 28, 2017

    ABSTRACT: Background: With the inflation of economic constraints on health care and demand to increase care quality, there is an increasing need to develop a clear understanding of what actions by health professionals are perceived as threatening quality care. Objective: To explore graduate nursing and pastoral care student’s perceptions of missed care in Norway. Research design: A qualitative study was employed with the formation of six focus groups. Data was analyzed via a thematic content of the discussions. Participants and research context: Thirty-one students attending a University College in Oslo participated. Findings: Five major themes and thirty subthemes were identified. Major themes included labor constraints, organizational contraints, professional constraints, communication constaints and emotional strain. Discussion: Findings of this study resonate with other research as well as with studies on missed nursing care. Findings also lend support to the definition of missed nursing care actions as required care that is omitted, either in part or whole, or delayed. Conclusion: The findings from this study extend understanding of what barriers health professionals perceive as inhibiting them from offering quality care. The focus groups provided a valuable flora for discussion regarding what participants perceived as missed.