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Steele, V.E. and Lubet, R.A. (2010) The Use of Animal Models for Cancer Chemoprevention Drug Development. Seminars in Oncology, 37, 327-338.
https://doi.org/10.1053/j.seminoncol.2010.05.010

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Altered Serum Lipids in the Cases of Head and Neck Cancer Associated with the Habit of Tobacco Consumption

    AUTHORS: Setty L. N. Chandra Mohan, D. Satyanarayana

    KEYWORDS: Lipids, Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Head and Neck Cancer

    JOURNAL NAME: International Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, Vol.6 No.3, May 31, 2017

    ABSTRACT: Alterations in serum lipid profile patterns have long been associated with malignancies, and their role remains controversial with respect to head and neck cancer. Due to an increased rate of neoplastic cell multiplication and reduced supply, there is increased utilization of lipids causing Hypolipidemia. Adding to this, tobacco contains carcinogens capable of damaging the cell membrane components including lipids resulting in further hypolipidemia. Thus the purpose of the present case control study is to discuss the alterations in plasma lipid profile in head and neck cancer patients in association with tobacco consumption. This hospital based study includes 80 cases of head and neck cancer patients and 50 controls. Plasma Lipids included are total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), triglycerides (TG). Student’s “t test” was applied to the data acquired. Values of P 0.05 were considered statistically insignificant.