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United States Environmental Protection Agency (1978) Noise: A Health Problem. United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Impact of Noise on Health: The Divide between Policy and Science

    AUTHORS: Arline L. Bronzaft

    KEYWORDS: Noise Pollution, Noise and Health, Noise and Public Policy

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.5 No.5, May 12, 2017

    ABSTRACT: In her chapter “Sources of Noise” in Noise and Health, Annette Zaner [1] writes that sounds have been environmental pollutants for thousands of years, citing examples of stories of loud music in the Old Testament and noisy delivery wagons in ancient times. The Industrial Revolution and urbanization in more recent times raised the decibel levels in our communities, especially with the growth in transportation on the roads, on the rails and in the air, as well as the growth of noise polluting products. The proliferation of boom cars, cell phones and wind turbines during the past twenty years has made our world even noisier. Studies have been carried out that have demonstrated the potential impact of these noises on our mental and physical health, and there have been some efforts to lessen some of the intrusive sounds, e.g. aircraft and road traffic noise, but there is still too little attention paid to the deleterious effects of noise. While noise complaints top the list of complaints in major cities worldwide and noise even threatens the natural sound systems of our planet, there is no movement globally to address the noise pollutant. The following paper will examine the research linking noise to health effects, question why governments have not seriously attempted to lower noise levels and suggest ways to lessen the din. Doing so will not only be beneficial to our health and well-being but it would also be wise economically.