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Riemer, A., Leuders, S., Thöne, M., Richard, H.A., Tröster, T. and Niendorf, T. (2014) On the Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in 316L Stainless Steel Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting. Engineering Fracture Mechanics, 120, 15-25.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.engfracmech.2014.03.008

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Corrosion Testing of a Heat Treated 316 L Functional Part Produced by Selective Laser Melting

    AUTHORS: Evy De Bruycker, Maria L. Montero Sistiaga, Fabien Thielemans, Kim Vanmeensel

    KEYWORDS: 316 L, Selective Laser Melting, Stress Corrosion Cracking, Residual Stresses, Heat Treatments

    JOURNAL NAME: Materials Sciences and Applications, Vol.8 No.3, March 8, 2017

    ABSTRACT: Selective Laser Melting (SLM) shows a big potential among metal additive manufacturing (AM) technologies. However, the large thermal gradients and the local melting and solidification processes of SLM result in the presence of a significant amount of residual stresses in the as built parts. These internal stresses will not only affect mechanical properties, but also increase the risk of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). A twister used in an air extraction pump of a condenser to create a swirl in the water, was chosen as a candidate component to be produced by SLM in 316 L stainless steel. Since the main expected damage mechanism of this component in service is corrosion, corrosion tests were carried out on an as-built twister as well as on heat treated components. It was shown that a low temperature heat treatment at 450℃ had only a limited effect on the residual stress reduction and concomitant corrosion properties, while the internal stresses were significantly reduced when a high temperature heat treatment at 950℃ was applied. Furthermore, a specific stress corrosion sensitivity test proved to be a useful tool to evaluate the internal stress distribution in a specific component.