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Johnson, A.P., Cavarocchi, N.C. and Hirose, H. (2015) Ventilator Strategies for VV ECMO Management with Concomitant Tracheal Injury and H1N1 Influenza. Heart, Lung and Vessels, 7, 74-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healun.2015.01.192

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Prone Position: Does It Help with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO)?

    AUTHORS: Nava Azimzadeh, Michael Baram, Nicholas C. Cavarocchi, Hitoshi Hirose

    KEYWORDS: ARDS, Prone Position, ECMO, Hypoxia, Obesity

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Respiratory Diseases, Vol.7 No.1, December 29, 2016

    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Lung protective ventilation therapy with low tidal volume-high PEEP is the standard treatment for the patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Oscillators are occasionally used for salvage ventilation in cases where poor compliance restricts the use of traditional ventilation with ARDS. In addition to ventilator therapy, prone positioning has been used to improve oxygenation. We presented a challenging case of ARDS, which failed medical management extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support and oscillatory ventilation. Prone positioning was initiated which improved oxygenation, respiratory compliance and posterior atelectasis. Case presentation: A 41-year-old morbid obese female developed ARDS due to influenza pneumonia. The patient remained hypoxic despite optimum medical and ventilator management and required veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO). CT scan of the chest showed ARDS with posterior consolidation. Despite ARDSnet ventilation support, antiviral therapy and ECMO support, there was no clinical improvement. High frequency oscillatory ventilation was initiated on ECMO day #13, which resulted in no respiratory improvement over the next 5 days. On ECMO day #18, the patient was placed on a Rotaprone? bed Therapy, utilizing a proning strategy of 16 hours a day. The clinical improvements observed were resolving of the consolidation on CXR, improvements in ventilatory parameters and decreased oxygen requirements. The patient was successfully weaned off ECMO on POD#25 (8 days post prone bed). Conclusions: Prone position improved oxygen saturation and pulmonary compliance in severe ARDS requiring ECMO and it might facilitate early weaning.