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Jacquelinet, C. and Briançon, S. (2005) Epidemiological and Information Network in Nephrology (Rein): A National Register of Replacement Treatments for Chronic Renal Insufficiency. Bulletin Epidémiologique Hebdomadaire, 37-38.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Epidemiological Profile of Chronic Kidney Disease at the General Hospital of National Reference of N’Djamena (Chad)

    AUTHORS: Ibrahim Hamat, Guillaume Mahamat Abderraman, Zeinab Maïga Moussa Tondi, Mahamat Youssouf, Mouhammadou Moustapha Cisse, Fotclossou Tara, Elhaj Fary Ka, Abdou Niang, Boucar Diouf

    KEYWORDS: Chronic Kidney Disease, Epidemiology, N’djamena, Chad

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Nephrology, Vol.6 No.3, September 19, 2016

    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Chronic renal failure is a disease that affects many patients worldwide and increasingly in Africa. At the end of 2003, about 1.1 million people were suffering from End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and were treated with periodic dialysis [12]. In Africa, CKF represents 2% to 10% of hospital admissions and is responsible for 4% to 22% of deaths [14]. So, this study is conducted for the first time in Chad, with the aims to determine the prevalence of CKD. Methods: This was a retrospective, descriptive and analytical study over a period of 12 months from April 29, 2011 to April 28, 2012. All patients with chronic renal failure regardless of etiology and stage of chronic kidney disease were included in the study. Chronic renal failure was defined as a glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min/1.73m (MDRD) for more than 3 months. This study was conducted in several departments of the National General Reference Hospital (NGRH) of N’Djamena. Result: Among 2039 inpatients, 195 patients had chronic renal failure, as a frequency of 9.6%. The average age of our patients was 51 ± 16.8 years, ranging from 11 to 85 years. Male predominance was noted to be 59% of men against 41% of women. We noted that high blood pressure accounted for 66.2% (N = 129) of cases, diabetes in 48.2% (N = 94), alcoholism in 28.7% (N = 56), smoking in 14.9% (N = 29) and the association alcoholism-smoking in 19.5% (N = 38). Hypertension was the leading cause of chronic renal failure (66.2%). All patients had a serum creatinine and creatinine clearance was assessed. Among them, we noted 57 patients (29%) with end-stage renal failure. The average calcium and phosphate serum were 1.8 mmol/l and 1.6 mmol/l, respectively. We noted that 120 patients as 61.5%, currently took herbal medicine. 48 out of 57 of our patients with ESRD as 24.6% of patients in the study had received replacement therapy (hemodialysis) with 12.5% of deaths. Conclusion: Chad, who compiled the first study with 195 patients at the General Hospital of N’Djamena National Reference over a period of one year has objectified a prevalence of chronic renal failure of 9.6%.