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Morningstar, M.W. and Joy, T. (2006) Scoliosis Treatment Using Spinal Manipulation and the Pettibon Weighting System: A Summary of 3 Atypical Presentations. Chiropractic & Osteopathy, 14, 1.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Radiographic, Pain, and Functional Outcomes in an Adult Post-Fusion Patient Using a Scoliosis Activity Suit: Comparative Results after 8 Months

    AUTHORS: Mark W. Morningstar, Brian Dovorany, Clayton J. Stitzel, Aatif Siddiqui

    KEYWORDS: Chiropractic, Pain, Rehabilitation, Scoliosis, Spine

    JOURNAL NAME: International Journal of Clinical Medicine, Vol.7 No.4, April 28, 2016

    ABSTRACT: There are few conservative treatment options for adult patients with idiopathic scoliosis who are status post-fusion surgery. These typically include pharmacologic pain management, epidural injections, and generalized CAM treatments such as massage and chiropractic manipulation in the non-fused areas of the spine. The purpose of this study was to compare the post-treatment results in an adult post-fusion patient who wore a scoliosis activity suit for 8 months. Pain was evaluated using a quadruple visual analog scale (QVAS), while function was measured using an SRS-22r questionnaire. After 8 months of wearing the scoliosis activity suit, her pain scores improved, here SRS-22r improved, and a significant correction in radiographic Cobb angle was observed. This case report is the first to document a Cobb angle change in an adult patient wearing a scoliosis activity suit who is status post-fusion. Given that pain and dysfunction are primary reasons for scoliosis treatment in the adult population, more studies need to address the disparity between available treatments for adult scoliosis and the incidence of adult scoliosis, especially in the post-meno-pausal population. Future prospective studies should consider evaluating treatment effects of this suit using intent-to-treat methodology.