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Urba, W. and Longo, D. (1986) Primary Solid Tumor of the Heart. In: Kapoor, A., Ed., Cancer of the Heart, Springer Verlag, New York, 62-75.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-4898-9_6

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Right Ventricular Myxoma—A Case Report

    AUTHORS: Ramachandran Muthiah

    KEYWORDS: Myxoma, Right Ventricle, Echocardiography, Ball-Valve Thrombus, Cardiac “Stone”

    JOURNAL NAME: Case Reports in Clinical Medicine, Vol.5 No.4, April 26, 2016

    ABSTRACT: From an epidemiologic perspective, cardiac myxomas are best divided into the following 2 categories: those that arise in isolation and those that arise in the setting of a syndrome (so called Carney Complex). The former account for about 90% - 95% of cases, while the later account for a minority of cases and those arise from the right or left ventricle constitute as 3% each. Real-time two-dimensional echocardiography has proved to be extremely useful in defining intracavitary masses. With two-dimensional echocardiography accurate visualization of the right ventricular body and outflow tract can be accomplished consistently. The acoustic nature and anterior location of the right ventricular myxomas make them appear as bright, mobile masses. The mobile nature of the tumor can easily be appreciated and its point of attachment, or stalk can be visualized accurately. Background of this case illustrates the transthoracic 2D echocardiographic pattern of right ventricular myxoma and its attachment by a pedicle to the anterior papillary muscle, masquerading as ball-valve thrombus and cardiac “stone” in tilted parasternal long axis-3 chamber views in a 15-year-old girl. Mahaim criteria to distinguish myxoma from organizing thrombus had been highlighted.